The G7 Fashion Pact to save our planet

G7 Fashion Pact

Fashion brands’ attention to supply chain traceability

It is no secret that consumers are aware of the significant flaws that go on behind the scenes in the fashion industry. That’s because consumers are now willing to do the research. They’re after transparent brands who can prove where their products have come from with evidence of traceability.  As a result of education on ways in which we can reduce our negative impact and unethical practices on our environment has become a global trend. Therefore this influences the way consumers choose to shop.

Recently, the Group of Seven Summit (G7) meeting in Biarritz France, August 24-27, brought forth the wealthiest world leaders from the countries; France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. United together, new practical initiatives were deliberated to manage key areas regarding climate change, biodiversity and the harmful damages that are affecting our oceans. The fashion industry is the second biggest polluting contributor in the world, and largely responsible for modern-day slavery. As a result of the G7 meeting, a “Fashion Pact” has been officially launched and signed by 37 brands to reverse the environmental damage caused by the fashion industry.

How are companies planning on reducing their global footprint?

By introducing a set of shared objectives that include;

STOP GLOBAL WARMING

  • An action plan comprising of zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius.

RESTORE BIODIVERSITY

  • To carry out objectives that use science-based targets to restore natural ecosystems and protect species.

PROTECT THE OCEANS

  • Reducing the fashion industry’s negative impact on the world’s oceans including; removing single-use plastic.

What does this mean for the textile industry?

  • Have a record to authenticate the history and location of your raw materials.

Before a dress became a dress, and before it was just a piece of fabric. Consumers are now demanding brands to trace down their supply chain, and answer- where did the raw material come from? Because of this, consumers seek confidence in product quality and the safety of the farmers, garment maker and the ones who are manufacturing.

The ignorance of companies disregarding proper information on their traceability has in the past, resulted in unfortunate events. For instance, the collapse of Bangladesh’s Rana Plaza in 2013. Brands didn’t know their products were made in the factory, thus illustrating there were problems of traceability in the supply chain. For this reason, consumers are turning away from companies who cannot fully disclose the origin of the products they source. Technology has heightened our awareness and environmental concern to the brand’s ethical practices. Companies will now have to accelerate sustainable plans and have traceable records of their supply chain in order to keep their consumers.

To conclude for those in the textile industry. It is essential to keep a record of where the fabric was produced and who it has been distributed to. This will distinguish the wholesaler from their competitors as brands can then show evidence that they are reliable and trustworthy.

To date, the 32 companies in agreement to the G7 Fashion Pact;

ADIDAS, BESTSELLER, BURBERRY, CAPRI HOLDINGS LIMITED, CARREFOUR, CHANEL, ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA, EVERYBODY & EVERYONE, FASHION3, FUNG GROUP, GALERIES LAFAYETTE, GAP Inc., GIORGIO ARMANI, H&M GROUP, HERMES, INDITEX, KARL LAGERFELD, KERING, LA REDOUTE, MATCHESFASHION.COM, MONCLER, NIKE, NORDSTROM, PRADA GROUP, PUMA, PVH Corp., RALPH LAUREN, RUYI, SALVATORE FERRAGAMO, SELFRIDGES GROUP, STELLA MCCARTNEY, TAPESTRY.

 

 

 

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